Speakers

INVITED
Reka Albert

Reka Albert

Distinguished Professor of Physics and Biology, Pennsylvania State University & Fellow of the Network Science Society

BIO
Réka Albert is Distinguished Professor of Physics and Biology at Pennsylvania State University. She is well-known for the Barabási-Albert model of scale-free networks. Her current research focuses on dynamic modeling of biological networks and systems biology. In particular she studies signal transduction networks in plants, signaling in cancer cells and the stability of mutualistic communities. She is a fellow of the Network Science Society and the American Physical Society, and External member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Her honors include a Sloan Research Fellowship, an NSF CAREER Award and a APS Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award.
Stefano Boccaletti

Stefano Boccaletti

Director of Research at the Institute of Complex Systems of the Italian CNR, in Florence.

BIO
Stefano Boccaletti is Director of Research at the Institute of Complex Systems of the Italian CNR, in Florence.
His major scientific interests are pattern formation and competition in extended media, chaos recognition, control and synchronization, and the structure and dynamics of complex networks.
He has been Scientific Attache’ of the Italian Embassy in Israel during the years 2007-2011 and 2014-2018. He is Editor in Chief of the Journal “Chaos, Solitons and Fractals” (Elsevier) from 2013, and member of the Academia Europaea since 2016. His monograph ¨Complex Networks: Structure and Dynamics¨, published in Physics Reports on 2006 converted into the most quoted paper ever appeared in the Annals of that Journal.
Lucilla de Arcangelis

Lucilla de Arcangelis

Professor of Physics, Second University of Naples & Secretary of the Commission C3 of the IUPAP

BIO
Lucilla de Arcangelis is Full Professor of Theoretical Physics of Condensed Matter at Department of Industrial and Information Engineering, Second University of Naples. Her research interests span from percolation, fractals, cellular automata to spin glass, models for fracture and gelation. Recently, she has focused on statistical properties of earthquake occurrence and neuronal activity on complex networks – particularly electro-physiological and fMRI data analysis, and performance in complex learning. She is the secretary of the commission on statistical physics (C3) of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics.
Diego Garlaschelli

Diego Garlaschelli

Professor of Physics, IMT School of Advanced Studies in Lucca and Lorentz Institute for Theoretical Physics in Leiden

BIO
Diego Garlaschelli is Associate Professor in Physics at the IMT School of Advanced Studies in Lucca and at the Lorentz Institute for Theoretical Physics of Leiden University. He is also Associate Fellow of the Saïd Business School at Oxford University. His research is driven by strongly interdisciplinary interests, including network theory, economic complexity, social dynamics, statistical physics and graph theory. He his well known for major contributions related to ensemble theory of networks and applications to network inference and statistical validation.
Gourab Ghoshal

Gourab Ghoshal

Professor of Physics, Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Rochester

BIO
Gourab Ghoshal is Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy at University of Rochester, with joint appointments at the departments of Computer Science and Mathematics, and CoE Distinguished Researcher. His research interests are in the theory and applications of complex networks as well as non-equilibrium statistical physics and its interdisciplinary applications to game theory, econophysics, dynamical systems and the origins of life. Recently his focus is on the study of human mobility and cities using a variety of big data techniques ranging from network theory to machine learning.
Kwang-Il Goh

Kwang-Il Goh

Professor of Physics, Korea University Seoul

BIO
Kwang-Il Goh is Professor of Physics at Korea University in Seoul where he co-directs the Statistical Physics Laboratory. His research interests are statistical physics, complex networks theory and modeling and physics application to interdisciplinary problems. He is known for his studies on human disease networks and on scale-free and self-similar networks. Recently is focus is on dynamical processes on multiplex networks. He is a member of the Korean Physical Society, American Physical Society and Korean Society for Bioinformatics.
Joseph Loscalzo

Joseph Loscalzo

Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine, Harvard Medical School & Chairman of Medicine Department and Physician-in-Chief, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

BIO
Joseph Loscalzo is Hersey Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and chairman of the Department of Medicine and physician-in-chief at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He is also Director of the Brigham Biomedical Research Institute.
He is recognized as an outstanding cardiovascular scientist, clinician, and teacher, and has received many awards for his work. He has has helped significantly advance the understanding of cardiovascular function and pathobiology through his work with nitric oxide. He is among the founders of the field of Network Medicine, wherein one explores holistically interacting networks of proteins that regulate phenotypes.
Miguel Á. Muñoz

Miguel Á. Muñoz

Professor of Physics, University of Granada

BIO
Miguel Ángel Muñoz is Professor of Physics at University of Granada. He is an expert in statistical mechanics and has worked, among other issues, on non-equilibrium phase transitions, critical and collective phenomena and stochastic processes. In particular, he contributed to developing the theory of self-organized criticality and made diverse contributions to network theory (for instance he introduced the concept of Griffiths phases in complex networks). His research interest spans from fundamental principles of statistical mechanics to interdisciplinary applications in systems and evolutionary biology, theoretical ecology, and neuroscience.
Mercedes Pascual

Mercedes Pascual

Professor of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago

BIO
Mercedes Pascual is Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at the University of Chicago, and is affiliated with University of Michigan and the Santa Fe Institute. She studies the population dynamics of infectious diseases, their response to changing environments and their interplay with pathogen diversity. She is also interested in the structure and dynamics of large ecological networks of consumer-resource interactions (food webs). Among her honors, in 2002 she was put in the top-50 women in science by Discover magazine, and in 2014 she got the Robert H. MacArthur Award from the Ecological Society of America. She is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
Evimaria Terzi

Evimaria Terzi

Professor of Computer Science, Boston University

BIO
Evimaria Terzi is Professor at the Computer Science Department of Boston University, where she is a member of the Data Management Lab, and Associate Chair of Academics. Her research interests span a wide range of algorithmic data-mining topics, with emphasis on social networks and social media analysis, recommendation systems, ranking and clustering, and urban informatics. Among her honors, she is a recipient of the IBM Outstanding Award (2008), the Microsoft Faculty Fellowship (2010), the NSF CAREER award (2013) and the Nokia Fellowship (2016).
Francesca Tria

Francesca Tria

Researcher, Sapienza University of Rome

BIO
Francesca Tria is a researcher at the Physics Department of Sapienza University of Rome, and external member of the Complexity Science Hub in Vienna. Her research activity includes complex systems approaches to biologically related problems, such as evolutionary dynamics and phylogeny reconstruction, as well as to social phenomena, such as language evolution, opinion dynamics and learning. In recent years she started to study problems related to dynamics of creativity and innovation, introducing a framework based on Polya’s urn to model the expansion into the adjacent possible – the concept introduced by Kauffmann in the context of biological evolution.
Petra Vertes

Petra Vertes

MQ Fellow, University of Cambridge & Fellow of the Alan Turing Institute

BIO
Petra Vertes is an MQ Fellow in Bioinformatics at the Brain Mapping Unit of University of Cambridge and Fellow of the Alan Turing Institute. In her work she applies tools from physics, bioinformatics and data science to fundamental problems in neuroscience and mental health. In particular, she is interested in the structure-function relationship in brain networks, from the microscopic scale of neurons to the large-scale connectivity of brain regions, as well as in the understanding and developing therapeutic approaches to cognitive impairments associated with psychiatric disorders, brain injury and ageing.
SCHOOL
Elsa Arcaute

Elsa Arcaute

Professor of Advanced Spatial Analysis, University College London

BIO
Elsa Arcaute is Associate Professor at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at the University College London. Her research focuses on modelling and analysing urban systems from the perspective of complexity sciences. Her main branches of research are urban scaling laws, hierarchies in urban systems, defining city boundaries, and the analysis of urban processes – such as quantifying inequality and resilience, and understanding how innovation emerges. Her studies are based on percolation theory and networks embedded in a spatial context. During her career she looked at different systems, from ant colonies to sustainable villages, and smart cities.
Ginestra Bianconi

Ginestra Bianconi

Professor in Applied Mathematics, Queen Mary University of London & Fellow of the Alan Turing Institute

BIO
Ginestra Bianconi is Professor of Applied Mathematics at the School of Mathematical Sciences of Queen Mary University of London. Her research activity on network science includes network theory and data science interdisciplinary applications. She has worked on statistical modeling of networks and the formulation of advanced information theory methods to extract relevant information from network data. Her major contributions include works that mathematically model complex systems and predict their functional behavior. Recently her research focus is on generalized network structures including multilayer networks and simplicial complexes.
Petra Kralj Novak

Petra Kralj Novak

Researcher, Jožef Stefan Institute Ljubljana

BIO
Petra Kralj Novak is a researcher at the Department of Knowledge Technologies, Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Her research belongs to the area of knowledge discovery from databases. Currently she studies social and mainstream media focusing on the mediated sentiment and hate speech, as well as on the role of emojis in conveying sentiment. She also studies rule induction from class labeled data, where the induced rules are intended for human interpretation. She designed and implemented GMOtreck, a system for optimization of laboratory level traceability of genetically modified organisms.
José Fernando Mendes

José Fernando Mendes

Professor of Physics, University of Aveiro & Fellow of the Network Science Society

BIO
José Fernando Mendes is Professor of Physics at Physics Department, University of Aveiro. He is a theoretical physicist working on statistical physics. His research, in the last years, focus mainly in the study of complex systems and the structure and the evolution of complex networks like the World Wide Web, the Internet, biological networks, and so on. Other interests are related with granular media, self-organized criticality, non-equilibrium phase transitions, deposition models. He got the Gulbenkian Prize of Science in 2004, and he is a fellow of the Network Science Society and of the American Physical Society.
Adilson E. Motter

Adilson E. Motter

Professor of Physics, Northwestern University & Erdös-Rényi Prize in Network Science

BIO
Adilson E. Motter is the Charles E. and Emma H. Morrison Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Northwestern University. His research is focused on the dynamical behavior of complex systems and networks, in particular he studied synchronization and cascading failures in various systems, recently focusing on symmetry breaking in networks. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His honors include a Sloan Research Fellowship, an NSF CAREER Award, the Weinberg Award for Excellence in Mentoring, the Erdös-Rényi Prize in Network Science, and a Simons Foundation Fellowship.
Filippo Radicchi

Filippo Radicchi

Professor of Complex Networks and Systems Research, Indiana University Bloomington

BIO
Filippo Radicchi is Associate Professor in the Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering at Indiana University Bloomington. His main areas of research are network science (in particular community detection, critical phenomena in percolation and epidemic spreading, and generalized network structures) and science of science. His honors include the Junior Scientific Award of the Complex Systems Society in 2014 and the NSF Career Award in 2016. He is also an Outstanding Referee of the APS.